May 2, 2020

Ont CA says bag search unlawful, order $500 in damages

Stewart v. Toronto (Police Services Board), 2020 ONCA 255 (CanLII)

The Court of Appeal for Ontario held that the Toronto Police breached sections 2(b), 8 and 9 of the Charter by enforcing a “condition of entry” to a public park because they were not properly authorized to establish the condition.

The City of Toronto had authorized the police to act as its agents “for the purpose of administering the Trespass to Property Act.” Acting under this authority, the police decided to search bags (and all other things in which weapons could be concealed) possessed by those attending a G20 protest at Allan Gardens. The appellant took issue with the legality of this “condition of entry.” The police restrained him when he refused to comply, searched his bag and confiscated a pair of swim goggles. You can see a video of the altercation here.

The Court of Appeal decision turned on text of the grant of authorization, which the Court held was too narrow given the Trespass to Property Act only provides property owners and occupiers with “a suite of enforcement powers” and not a power to create restrictions on access to property. It said, “The jurisprudence consistently takes a rigorous approach when interpreting the sources of legal authority relied upon by government to encroach upon the liberty of the subject.”

The Court ordered the police to pay $500 in damages. It said the appellant (who drew attention to his fate during the altercation and afterwards) did not establish any reputational or other personal loss. The Court also noted that the police acted in good faith with a view to the safety of the public.